Does “Klout” Matter

Wendy KloutYour Klout score is a number between 1-100 that represents how influential you are online. The higher your score the more influence you have. It is determined by monitoring your activity on sites including Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram and others.

How is Your Klout Score Determined?

Klout monitors your activity across various social networks and uses attributes that include retweets, likes, follows and comments to update your score each day. The more you post and the more engagement or responses you have to your posts the more influence you are building. The score fluctuates daily depending on whom you’ve interacted with and what interactions have taken place on any given day.

Social networks gave us an online voice. Figuring out how to use that voice effectively is key to managing your online brand. You might be posting constantly but if no body is engaging or if no one cares your efforts don’t really matter. In other words one post that gets ten likes and/comments is better than 10 posts with no likes/comments. You can yell all you want online but what matters is who hears you.

Finding Your Voice and Building Influence

 The average Klout score is 40. Those who have a Klout score above 63 represent the top 5% of all Klout users. You can find out your Klout score by visiting Klout.com and creating an account. Just link up your social networks and Klout will begin tracking your online influence. Start to monitor what you post and what the reactions are to the various types of content you share on different networks. This will give you great insights into what topics resonate with your online sphere of influence and help you find your voice across the various social audiences. You may find that an update on one network creates lots of engagement but that same update on another network gets no activity. Each network has its own voice and hot buttons. Learning those will make you a better online communicator and ultimately more influential.

Cutting Through the Noise

 It’s pretty easy to say you need to get more people to engage with you online. It’s a whole other thing to figure out how to do that.  Here are three proven strategies to increase engagement:

  1. Know your audience and create content that is interesting to them. Share your real estate expertise by answering common questions or weighing in on hot topics, share tips, post photos and post quotes.
  2. Connect with other influencers. Watch what they post, engage with them and get inspired by them.
  3. Start conversations and join conversations. Ask questions, join Twitter chats, and pay compliments.

All of these activities tend to result in engagement and will help you cut through the online noise.

Take the 90-Day Klout Challenge

 Over the next 90 days I challenge you to monitor your Klout score and be strategic about your posts and engagements in an effort to increase your score.  Have fun with it and learn from it. You’ll become a better content creator as a result of this exercise and that will not only help build your online influence but the bottom line of our business.

Note: This article was originally published by RIS Media in their January 2014 magazine and online. It was written by me on behalf of Carrington Real Estate Services.  We are doing lots of great stuff at Carrington so check us out and let me know if you would like to talk about opportunities!

Published by Wendy Forsythe

I've spent my career working with people and organizations to help them build their brands. We live in a connected world where that line between a personal and professional persona has become nonexistent. Your brand is you 24/7. This blog is about me and my life. Some of it will relate to my passion for the real estate industry and some of it will just be about me living life and exploring my interests. The opinions expressed here are my own personal opinions.

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